Posted in Doctor Who: Extra/Behind the Scenes, News, Ongoing Series, Video

New Behind the Scenes Videos Released for The Husbands of River Song

The BBC have released a series of behind the scenes videos for tonights The Husband’s of River Song. Please not for those outside the UK, these videos contain spoilers.

All videos can be watched via the BBC’s official YouTube channel below:

Never sneak on a Doctor Who set

River the Bad Girl

Greg Davies on King Hydroflax

The Creepiest Thing Ever

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Posted in Doctor Who: Extra/Behind the Scenes, Filming, News, Ongoing Series, Video, Video Interviews

All “Extra” Videos For Hell Bent, Maisiecam, Capaldi & Coleman Speak

The BBC have released a series of short videos surrounding the production of Hell Bent, including comments from Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman, alongside #Maisiecam featuring Ashildr actress Maisie Williams. You can watch the videos via the BBC’s official YouTube channel below.

Interviews

What classic monsters would Peter Capaldi like to return?

Jenna Coleman’s funniest moment

Jenna Coleman’s hardest scene

Jenna Looks Back “The Best Part Of My Life”

#Masiecam

Ashildr from the Future

Maisie the Flying Drone

The Truth Behind the TARDIS

Others

A sneak peek of The Doctor’s new Sonic Screwdriver

How to build a TARDIS in 50 seconds

Posted in Doctor Who: Extra/Behind the Scenes, News, Ongoing Series, Previews, Video

*Spoilers* Everything We Know about Doctor Who Series 9: Cast, Filming Photos, Videos & More [May 8, 2015 Update]

Doctor Who Series 9

Doctor-Who-9-5

Regular Cast

The Doctor: Peter Capaldi

Clara Oswald: Jenna Coleman


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Crew

Writers: Steven Moffat, Jamie Mathieson, Toby Whithouse, Catherine Tregenna, Mark Gatiss

*Rumoured writers include Neill Cross and Peter Harness

Directors: Hettie MacDonald, Daniel O’Hara, Ed Bazelgette

Photo taken for International Women’s Day with the many women of Doctor Who’s cast and crew!

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Quotes:

“As you saw in the finale and the Christmas episode he’s kind of answered his question of ‘Am I a good man?’ and this year he’s having the time of his life, having dangerous and exciting adventures in time and space. These are the glory days of the Doctor and Clara. They’re having the biggest, most dangerous adventures they’ve ever had and they’re having great fun doing it. The mission statement we had was bigger adventures, and to go further in space and time. We’ve got a very confident Doctor, we’ve got a very confident companion and they’re both experts at doing this now so we can tell slightly bigger stories. We’re doing more two-parters – and not just conventional two parters. We’re doing linked stories where you might not be sure how they’re going to be connected until you see them. We’re pushing the storytelling that way, to give us more scale of adventure.” – Brian Minchin, Cultbox

“As ever, Doctor Who is a combination of complete daft silliness and loads of people getting slaughtered in the early evening. Tonally, [Season 9] very much the same [as Season 8]. Peter is getting stronger and more confident in the role… I told the [show’s] writers, don’t just write him mean, write him funny – because he’ll make any joke fly.” – Steven Moffat, Entertainment Weekly

“[Peter Capaldi] is on amazing form at the moment. I was looking at some of his first series stuff and thinking ‘it’s magnificent, but it’s nothing compared to what he’s doing now’.” – Steven Moffat on Peter Capaldi

“I can’t say too much about it. She continues to complicate and that relationship between the two of them is incredibly strong.” – Steven Moffat on Clara Oswald

“We’re changing the rhythm of [Doctor Who] quite a bit. For a long while, those 45-minute stories were the backbone of Doctor Who. The rule I’ve got is that you won’t be absolutely certain whether a show is going to be a two-parter or not. With each of the two-parters we’re doing, there’s a substantial difference between the two halves…. Sometimes they’re just linked episodes” – Steven Moffat on the Series 9 format

“We’re not bringing him back exactly the same as we left him, at all. I think that was already evident at Christmas,” he explained. “He’s left some of the burden of being the superhero of the universe behind… Also, Peter magnifies anything that is dark. So I’m pushing him – I’m writing quite funny this year – I’m pushing him the other way. He’s also got a Scottish gloom about him. If you gave him a Matt Smith script, it would come out very, very differently. I think it was great fun to do for a year. But no, that’s not how we’re going to play the rest of him… What I’ve been saying to him is ‘You’re the stern Doctor. You’re not the rude Doctor. You’re not a brusque Doctor. You’re kind of the don’t-give-a-damn Doctor! You actually don’t give a damn what you say to people.’” – Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Magazine

“Jenna is obviously in all of the next series.” – Steven Moffat on Jenna Coleman’s departure date.

“I’m in the midst of that right now – I broke off to come here today, in fact, but I’m hoping to finish the script tonight. It has been a tough nut to crack, but I’m delighted with how scary it is. I can’t say any more than that.” – Mark Gatiss on his episode.

DW9a


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Episodes

Episode 1: The Magician’s Apprentice

Written by: Steven Moffat

Directed by: Hettie MacDonald

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Michelle Gomez (Missy), Jemma Redgrave (Kate Stewart), Jaye Griffiths, Clare Higgins, India Ria Amarteifio, Dasharn Anderson, Harki Bhambra, Daniel Hoffmann-Gill, Aaron Neil, Demi Papaminas, Joey Price and Jami Reid-Quarrell, Kelly Hunter, Jaye Griffiths, Demi Papaminas (School girl)

Video:

Quotes:

“I was thinking of the story of the first two-parter and I was thinking that she fits, she should be there. That character, if you get it right, does put a different light on the Doctor. I was looking back at the old Jon Pertwee/Roger Delgado ones and what’s fascinating about that is that they only ever play it as friends. They never, ever play it as enemies at all. They’re just two gentlemen having fun with each other. The Doctor’s best friend is a murdering psychopath, that’s actually quite fun.” – Steven Moffat on Missy’s return.

“”Missy is brilliant and having seen her in the finale we just couldn’t wait to work with Michelle again. Steven had the perfect story. It’s not going to be Missy as you expect her to be. Steven likes to surprise everyone and he’s going to do that with this opening. Missy has an awful lot of sides to her and we’re going to see some new ones in this series. We also learn a bit more about her relationship with the Doctor…” – Brian Minchin, SFX Magazine

Notes:

Filming took place in Tenerife, Spain. Set partially on an alien planet and in contemporary London, expect Coal Hill to feature and Jemma Redgrave.


Episode 2: The Witch’s Familiar

Missy returns in the Series 9 opening two-parter

Written by: Steven Moffat

Directed by: Hettie MacDonald

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Michelle Gomez (Missy), Jemma Redgrave (Kate Stewart), Jaye Griffiths and Clare Higgins, India Ria Amarteifio, Dasharn Anderson, Harki Bhambra, Daniel Hoffmann-Gill, Aaron Neil, Demi Papaminas, Joey Price and Jami Reid-Quarrell, Kelly Hunter, Jaye Griffiths, Demi Papaminas (School girl)

Filming Photos:

Filming Videos:

Via: Whovian Comley

Notes:

Filming took place in Tenerife, Spain. Set partially on an alien planet and in contemporary London, expect Coal Hill to feature and Jemma Redgrave.


Episode 3:

peter-capaldi-series-9-filming-whithouse-570x616

Written by: Toby Whithouse

Directed by: Daniel O’Hara

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Paul Kaye (Prentis), Sophie Stone (Cass), Morven Christie (O’Donnell), Arsher Ali (Mason Bennett), Colin McFarlane, Sophie Stone, Zaqi Ismail, Steven Robertson (Pritchard), Neil Fingleton.

Quotes:

“An amazing guest cast for a brilliantly creepy two-parter by Toby Whithouse. Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman are back in Cardiff, back in the box, and back in action – for one of our scariest adventures yet!” – Steven Moffat

“The adventures begin again for myself and Jenna and I’m delighted to be back filming my second series of Doctor Who.” – Peter Capaldi

“As a kid of the 1970s, the two shows you always watched were Top of the Pops and Doctor Who, they were unmissable. I actually wrote a song called ‘Looking For Davros’ in my first punk band and I sang it like a demented Dalek. I got to present TOTP back in the mid 90s and landing this role in Doctor Who completes the dream double. Peter is a perfect Doctor and I’m loving every minute of the experience, even the five hours in make-up. What a treat, best 50th birthday present ever!” – Paul Kaye

Notes:

Potentially a “ghost story” rumoured to be set in an army base.


Episode 4:

Written by: Toby Whithouse

Directed by: Daniel O’Hara

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Paul Kaye (Prentis), Sophie Stone (Cass), Morven Christie (O’Donnell), Arsher Ali (Mason Bennett), Colin McFarlane, Sophie Stone, Zaqi Ismail, Steven Robertson (Pritchard), Neil Fingleton.

Quotes:

“An amazing guest cast for a brilliantly creepy two-parter by Toby Whithouse. Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman are back in Cardiff, back in the box, and back in action – for one of our scariest adventures yet!” – Steven Moffat

“The adventures begin again for myself and Jenna and I’m delighted to be back filming my second series of Doctor Who.” – Peter Capaldi

“As a kid of the 1970s, the two shows you always watched were Top of the Pops and Doctor Who, they were unmissable. I actually wrote a song called ‘Looking For Davros’ in my first punk band and I sang it like a demented Dalek. I got to present TOTP back in the mid 90s and landing this role in Doctor Who completes the dream double. Peter is a perfect Doctor and I’m loving every minute of the experience, even the five hours in make-up. What a treat, best 50th birthday present ever!” – Paul Kaye

Notes:

Potentially a “ghost story” rumoured to be set in an army base.


Episode 5: The Girl Who Died

What’s that in the shadows? New monster about to meet Peter Capaldi and Jenna Coleman in Doctor Who Series 9

Written by: Jamie Mathieson and Steven Moffat

Directed by: Ed Bazelgette

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), David Schofield (Odin), Rufus Hound (Sam Swift), Murray McArthur (Hasten), Maisie Williams, Tom Stourton, Ariyon Bakare, Simon Lipkin, Ian Conningham, Barnaby Kay, John Voce, Struan Rodger

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Maisie Williams guest stars in The Girl Who Died/The Woman Who Lived

Quotes:

“There’s been a lot of speculation about whether she’s like a younger Clara or whether she is a new character completely. I’m not going to tell you which one. Whether she is good or bad is up for discussion, I think. She does put the Doctor to the test and it’s sort of a dynamic that we haven’t seen before.” – Maisie Williams

“I’m so excited to be working on Doctor Who as it’s such a big and important part of British Culture. I can’t wait to meet the cast and crew and start filming, especially as we’ll be shooting not too far from my home town” – Maisie Williams

“We’re thrilled to have Maisie Williams joining us on Doctor Who. It’s not possible to say too much about who or what she’s playing, but she is going to challenge the Doctor in very unexpected ways. This time he might just be out of his depth, and we know Maisie is going to give him exactly the right sort of hell.” – Steven Moffat

Video:

Notes:

Set in the time of the Vikings and dealing with Norse mythology.


Episode 6: The Woman Who Lived

Chewing it over? Doctor Who director Ed Bazalgette discusses a shot with one of the show’s new monsters…

Written by: Catherine Tregenna

Directed by: Ed Bazelgette

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), David Schofield (Odin), Rufus Hound (Sam Swift), Murray McArthur (Hasten), Maisie Williams, Tom Stourton, Ariyon Bakare, Simon Lipkin, Ian Conningham, Barnaby Kay, John Voce, Struan Rodger

Quotes:

“There’s been a lot of speculation about whether she’s like a younger Clara or whether she is a new character completely. I’m not going to tell you which one. Whether she is good or bad is up for discussion, I think. She does put the Doctor to the test and it’s sort of a dynamic that we haven’t seen before.” – Maisie Williams

“I’m so excited to be working on Doctor Who as it’s such a big and important part of British Culture. I can’t wait to meet the cast and crew and start filming, especially as we’ll be shooting not too far from my home town” – Maisie Williams

“We’re thrilled to have Maisie Williams joining us on Doctor Who. It’s not possible to say too much about who or what she’s playing, but she is going to challenge the Doctor in very unexpected ways. This time he might just be out of his depth, and we know Maisie is going to give him exactly the right sort of hell.” – Steven Moffat

Video:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02ptd3b/player

Filming Photos:

Notes:

Set in the time of the Vikings and dealing with Norse mythology.


Episode 7:

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“Osgood” Returns in this two-parter

Written by: Peter Harness

Directed by: Daniel Nettheim

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Jemma Redgrave (Kate Stewart), Ingrid Oliver (Osgood),  Jaye Griffiths, Cleopatra Dickens, Sasha Dickens, Abhishek Singh, Todd Kramer, Jill Winternitz, Nicholas Asbury, Jack Parker and Aidan Cook


Episode 8:

Written by: Peter Harness

Directed by: Daniel Nettheim

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald), Jemma Redgrave (Kate Stewart), Ingrid Oliver (Osgood),  Jaye Griffiths, Cleopatra Dickens, Sasha Dickens, Abhishek Singh, Todd Kramer, Jill Winternitz, Nicholas Asbury, Jack Parker and Aidan Cook


Episode 9:

Written by:

Directed by:

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald)


Episode 10:

Written by:

Directed by:

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald)


Episode 11:

Written by:

Directed by:

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald)

Quotes:

“I’ve figured out the cliffhanger to the penultimate episode of series 9. And it’s a whopper. Ohh, I don’t think you’ll see this coming!” – Steven Moffat, Doctor Who Magazine 475


Episode 12:

Written by:

Directed by:

Starring: Peter Capaldi (The Doctor), Jenna Coleman (Clara Oswald)

Notes:

Jenna Coleman is expected to leave the series at the conclusion of this episode.

Posted in Doctor Who: Extra/Behind the Scenes, News, Ongoing Series, Video

BBC Release Doctor Who Extra for Dark Water

The BBC have released this weeks edition of Doctor Who Extra, focusing on tonight’s Dark Water, it can be watched via the Official BBC YouTube channel below:

[aesop_video width=”780″ align=”center” src=”youtube” id=”npCpqguKQ0k” loop=”on” autoplay=”on” controls=”on” viewstart=”on” viewend=”on”]

Posted in Classic Series, Doctor Who: Extra/Behind the Scenes, Features, News, Video

Feature: Terry Nation, Raymond Cusick and the Birth of the Daleks

While An Unearthly Child and Anthony Coburn laid the foundations for Doctor Who as we know it today, it was arguably The Daleks and Terry Nation that ensured that there is a Doctor Who today. The show’s debut had been a success and generally well received, yet it needed a boost, a connection to the popular consciousness – enter The Daleks.

Known primarily as a comedy writer for the Goons and, at that time, Tony Hancock, Terry Nation may have seemed an unusual choice to be one of the writers invited to submit to the forthcoming Doctor Who in July of 1963, yet David Whitaker had been impressed with Nation’s first forays into science-fiction in 1962 with three episodes of ITV’s Out of this World: Imposter, Botony Bay and Immigrant, with Botony Bay being an entirely original work by the writer.

Speaking to Doctor Who Magazine in 1987, Nation tells of his initial outrage at being offered Doctor Who:

“We were working in a theatre in Nottingham, and my agent called from London and said ‘The BBC wants you to do a think called ‘Doctor Who’, it’s for the children’s television slot, science fiction’, and I said ‘How dare they? I don’t do things like that!’, but then I’d been asked because of this ‘Out of this World’ story. Well, this particular night, Tony Hancock and I had a big dispute. I wanted him to try some new material, and I’m not sure if I was fired or if I walked out, but the result was that I was on a train back to London, thinking ‘Hey, wait a minute! I’m out of work!’.”

By late July 1963, David Whitaker had received a detailed six-part storyline proposal from Nation entitled The Mutants (previously The Survivors) and instructs the BBC Copyright department to commission, Nation having managed to secure a higher than usual fee for his services.

Terry Nation with his famous creations

The Mutants was scheduled fourth in the series’ run and Rex Tucker was assigned to direct before his decision to leave the show, eventually to be replaced by Christopher Barry and Richard Martin. By early August the serial was expanded to seven episodes and given the new working title of Beyond the Sun, before reverting back to the original Mutants title and the first draft being sent back to Nation for rewrites at the suggestion of Whitaker. Through cancellations and delays The Mutants/The Daleks would eventually be moved to second in the running order, immediately after opening serial An Unearthly Child, Producer Verity Lambert said in a 1980s interview that many felt the serial went against creator Sydney Newman’s wishes:

Verity Lambert with a Dalek, pictured here in 1964

“David chose Terry Nation on the strength of some science fiction work he’d already done for ITV, ‘Journey Into the Unknown’. At first we were a bit wary about accepting his storyline about the Daleks, because of the bug-eyed monster concept. Sydney Newman had outlined a series that was part history and part educational towards science; the aim being to expose children to science and history and hopefully interest them in it. I didn’t feel the Daleks altered Sydney Newman’s format, mainly as they were in functioning metal cases. The crisis came when Donald Wilson saw the scripts for the first Dalek serial. Having spent so much time defending ‘Doctor Who’, he saw the Daleks as just bug-eyed monsters, which went against what he felt should be the theme of the science-fiction stories. There was a strong disagreement between us, in fact it went as far as Donald Wilson telling us not to do the show. What saved it in the end was purely that fact that we had nothing to replace it in the time alloted. It was the Daleks or nothing. What was very nice, though, was Donald Wilson coming up to me after the Daleks had taken off and saying ‘You obviously understand this programme better than I do. I’ll leave it to you’.”

Speaking in 1987, director Christopher Barry agrees that Sydney Newman was initially displeased with The Daleks:

“On ‘The Daleks’, Richard Martin and I worked very closely in the planning stages, and because our styles weren’t radically different, there weren’t any real clashes. The only problems we did experience came from Sydney Newman, who’d had quite a hand in the creation of the show and didn’t like the Daleks at all. I think he felt they were childish science fiction. When I first saw them, though, I was absolutely delighted.”

Originally two principal designers were designated to work on the show during it’s first season, both with very different remits. Barry Newbury would handle all historical adventures, while Raymond Cusick would handle the future set episodes, though originally Ridley Scott had been assigned to design The Daleks. Upon being given the assignment, Cusick called Nation who told the designer of his vision and that he wished for his new creations to “glide” like Georgian State dancers, saying in 1992:

“I’d grown up watching movies and was always vaguely disappointed because I knew the monsters were people, they were dressed-up people. So my first requirement was to make my monster non-humanoid. I didn’t want it to look like somebody dressed up in a funny costume, so I had to eliminate the legs. And I’d been to a concert of the Georgian State Dancers, and these ladies had these long skirts that went right down to the floor and they appeared to glide, you couldn’t see their feet at all. And I thought that was the sort of movement I wanted to achieve. And then the voice, it had to be a non-humanoid voice, coming out of a computer. I made a few mistakes. It would have been easier had I given them more manipulable hands. When they wanted to pass things to one another, it caused terrible problems. So basically with those requirements, that’s how the Daleks evolved.”

Cusick himself commented on the urban-myth of the pepper pot design in 2008:

“People do say I was inspired by a pepper pot – but I always think ‘If that’s all it takes to become a designer then it’s a doddle’.”

In fact the pepper pot claims came from a lunch meeting with special effects man Bill Roberts, Christopher Barry and Mervyn Pinfield, Cusick picking up a pepper pot from the table and moving it around the table, telling him that this is now the Dalek would move – no visible means.

“Ever since then people say I was inspired by a pepper pot – but it could have been the salt pot I picked up. When I’m asked what I was inspired by I suppose it was really a system of logic because I realised that you’ve got to have an operator to operate them. If you had anything mechanical, 10 to one on the take it would go wrong, so you’ve got a human being in there who would be absolutely totally reliable… I then thought ‘Well, the operator’s got to sit down’, [so I] drew a seat, ergonomic height, 18in, got the operator down, and then drew round him. That’s how the basic shape appeared.”

Terry Nation agreed that Cusick’s contribution to the popularity of the Daleks was enormous:

“Raymond Cusick made a tremendous contribution, and I would love to be glib enough to put it into percentage terms, but you can’t do that. You start with something that’s a writer’s dream, that he’s put down in words, and amended, and added to in conversations. Something starts there. Cusick didn’t get anything, to my understanding. I think they may have given him a hundred pound bonus, but he was a salaried employee, and I think he knew the nature of his work, and it was what he did every week. The copyrights resided with the BBC and myself, and there were lovely legal words to cover these things, so that before they could merchandise anything, they had to have my agreement. I was very lucky. The salt cellar part is the legend: that gave Raymond Cusick the idea for the shape. He was restricted by budget, obviously – it wasn’t a big budget show we were doing. But yes, he made a tremendous contribution. Whatever the Daleks are or were, his contribution was vast.”

Raymond Cusick with the Daleks, pictured here in 1964.

Filming commenced in early November and the entire first episode is deemed unfit for broadcast due to a technical fault, talk-back from the production assistant’s headphones being audible on the finished product. The episode was remounted and production pushed back one week. Speaking to John Fleming in 1978, Nation observed that nobody had any confidence in the serial or his creations:

“I didn’t have any confidence in the series. I read the brochure at the briefing and said, “There’s no way this show can ever succeed.” And I don’t think it could have done if it had followed the route that they had planned for it. That it actually went into historical situations and was reasonably educational. That was the direction the BBC wanted to take and Sydney Newman was bitterly opposed to any bug-eyed monsters. We could go into the future, but it had to have a relatively scientific base and it was going to be ‘good solid stuff’. He violently objected to the Daleks when he saw them in the script. It was only the determination of the producer Verity Lambert that got them on. Or maybe it was the fact that the BBC had to go on. They’d had them built and they’d spent so much money they had to go on. Nobody had faith in them, including myself.”

No bug eyed monsters!

The Daleks however captured the imagination, igniting interest in Doctor Who as the nation’s playgrounds reverberated with cries of “exterminate, exterminate,” the show ascending to ratings of 10.4m for episodes six and seven of the serial. It wouldn’t be until the Christmas of 1964 that Dalekmania truly entered the stratosphere, with toys and games flooding shelves and stockings. The rest is history.

Legend says however that when Terry Nation’s former charge Tony Hancock saw the Daleks, he exclaimed: “That bloody Nation! He stole my Daleks!” claiming that the design to the metallic monsters had been dreamed up in late night creative sessions, Hancock envisioning “an inverted cone, covered in ping pong balls and with a sink plunger coming out of its head.” Perhaps the final word however should go to Sydney Newman who graciously admits how wrong many were about the potential of the Daleks:

“Being a real aficionado of science fiction, I hated stories which used bug-eyed monsters, otherwise known as BEM’s. I write in my memo that there would be no bug-eyed monsters in ‘Doctor Who’. And after a few episodes,  Verity turned up with the Daleks! I bawled her out for it, but she said ‘Honest, Sydney, they’re not bug-eyed monsters – they’re human beings who are so advanced that their bodies have atrophied and they need these casings to manipulate and do the things they want!’. Of course, the Daleks took off and captured everybody’s imagination. Some of the best thing I have ever done are the thing I never wanted to do. It’s true! It’s worked out that way.”


This article is the second in our “Story by Story” series running all this week celebrating The Daleks. DWW welcomes all submissions and pitches on the theme throughout the week at dww@doctorwhoworldwide.com. 

In future weeks we shall be celebrating Inside the Spaceship (Nov 3 – 9), Marco Polo (Nov 10 – 16), The Keys of Marinus (Nov 17 – 23), The Aztecs (Nov 24 – 30), The Sensorites (Dec 1 – 7) and The Reign of Terror (Dec 8 – 14).